Plans for Barnet School

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BarnetschoolplansBARNET - The Caledonia County Supervisory Union is coming up with a way to be more accordance with Act 46, as well as hopes to increase reading percentiles in third grade students.

"Act 46 has created healthy conversations for small schools," said School Board Chair, Louis Bushey. "I think it's forcing communities to have conversations that I think we've all known."

The Superintendent's goal is to have 90% of third-graders to meet or exceed grade level expectations in reading by the end of the third grade year. Students currently range to be 10% and 67% proficient.

According to Caledonia County Supervisory Union, CCSU, research indicates that students who are not as proficient in reading by the end of third grade tend to have significantly more difficulty progressing in their learning throughout their educational career. "One out of six children who are not reading proficiently in third grade do not graduate from high school on time, a rate four times greater than that for proficient readers," stated in the Superintendant's September report.

The report also indicates that this would be a multi-year strategic plan that focuses on the students and their achievements.

There is a CCSU committee made of administrators and teachers that will meet regularly to review and discuss student data. The committee will also make sure teacher's developments are aligned with the goals and student outcomes.

Barnet Act 46 from NewsLINC on Vimeo.

The Superintendent's September Report highlighted the goals for 2016-2017 as:
- By the end of the third grade, 90% of students will meet or exceed grade level expectations in reading.
- Students will be engaged with high-quality, rigorous core instruction.
- Students will read, analyze and interpret complex grade-level texts.
- Students will examine multiple sources and cite relevant evidence to produce grade level on demand written arguments.

CCSU also plans on students being proficient in mathematics such as grade level computer skills and be able to solve multistep, complex math problems.

"There were things we could've and should've done in the past, but I think this is putting it front and center for us so that we're having to look at creative solutions to some of the challenges that we were facing as smaller communities," said Bushey.